It security – Tele Trust http://teletrust.info/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 06:49:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://teletrust.info/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon-2022-02-02T204231.652-150x150.jpg It security – Tele Trust http://teletrust.info/ 32 32 The use of more complex IT security strategies does not https://teletrust.info/the-use-of-more-complex-it-security-strategies-does-not/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 19:51:56 +0000 https://teletrust.info/the-use-of-more-complex-it-security-strategies-does-not/ London, UK, June 21, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Hornetsecurity’s survey reveals that organizations have enabled more M365 security features as they have been increasingly targeted by cyberattacks over the past year. A global IT security and compliance survey of more than 800 IT professionals found that the rate of IT security incidents increases as Microsoft […]]]>

London, UK, June 21, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Hornetsecurity’s survey reveals that organizations have enabled more M365 security features as they have been increasingly targeted by cyberattacks over the past year.

A global IT security and compliance survey of more than 800 IT professionals found that the rate of IT security incidents increases as Microsoft 365 security features are used. Organizations using Microsoft 365 that use 1 or 2 of its stock security features reported attacks 24.4% and 28.2% of the time, respectively, while those using 6 or 7 features reported attacks respectively 55.6% and 40.8% of the time. Overall, it was found that 3 in 10 organizations (29.2%) using Microsoft 365 reported a known security incident in the last 12 months.

Overall, the survey results indicate that while the use of additional security features is essential, it is more practical to use proven, user-friendly solutions – preferably performed by dedicated security professionals.

What do IT security professionals say?

Experts from Hornetsecurity, a leading provider of security and backup solutions for Microsoft 365, say it could be due to a number of factors. They highlight the likelihood that organizations with a large number of security features implemented have done so following sustained cyberattacks over a period of time, in an attempt to mitigate security threats.

They also suggest that the more IT teams attempt to implement security features, the more complex the security system becomes. Features can be misconfigured, leaving vulnerabilities. This is supported by the fact that 62.6% of respondents indicated that the main barrier to implementing security functionality in their organization is “lack of time or resources”.

Another theory is that using more features can contribute to a false sense of security within the organization. This might cause it to stop paying close attention to potential security threats, thinking that all these features will protect them without having to put in extra active effort.

“It’s a game of cat and mouse. As you grow, you add security features, but you also become more vulnerable to attack because you are a more lucrative target. Still, you need to stay one step ahead of criminals trying to harm your organization. Our survey results clearly showed that relying on inventory security features for digital security is insufficient,” said Daniel Hofmann, CEO of Hornetsecurity. “Organizations must proactively find ways to identify invisible vulnerabilities and take a diligent and holistic approach to cybersecurity, rather than relying on what is available and reacting only when it is too late.”

What barriers do IT professionals face in implementing security features in their organizations?

Surprisingly, a quarter of respondents (25.7%) who employ more than 50 people and have compliance requirements do not employ a dedicated compliance officer or a dedicated IT security officer. Several factors contribute to the lack of attention paid to IT security and compliance in medium and large enterprises.

Nearly 2 in 3 (62.6%) IT professionals surveyed cite “lack of time or resources” as the biggest barrier to implementing security functionality in their organization. Next, respondents cite a “lack of budget” (44.6%), “problems with skills and/or a lack of knowledge” (36.2%) and a “lack of interest from management” (23 .1%).

All of the above findings indicate a general lack of urgency surrounding security within organizations. Only 2% of respondents said they had no security barriers, and more than half of respondents (55.5%) said their organization did not have a process in place to track and change review – an essential tool for identifying security threats. .

What are the most commonly used security features in organizations?

Of the 11 security features listed in the survey, “spam filtering” was the most popular, with 84.4% of respondents reporting its use within their organization. “Multi-factor authentication” (82.7% of respondents) follows closely behind. ‘Web traffic filtration’, ‘permission management’ and ‘computer security awareness training for users’ are used by 68.8%, 66.4% and 61.2% respectively.

The least common security measure was “SIEM solution,” with only 14.1% of respondents implementing such a measure. However, “SIEM Solutions” had the highest incident rate at 42.1%, supporting the idea that more advanced security is needed as organizations become a bigger target.

About Hornetsecurity Group

Hornetsecurity is the leading provider of security and backup solutions for Microsoft 365. Its flagship product is the most comprehensive cloud security solution for Microsoft 365 on the market, offering robust, comprehensive and award-winning protection: spam and virus filtering , phishing and ransomware protection. , compliant archiving and encryption, advanced threat protection, email continuity, signatures and disclaimers. It is an all-in-one security package that even includes backup and recovery of all data in Microsoft 365 and user endpoints.

Hornetsecurity Inc. is headquartered in Pittsburgh, PA with additional North American offices in Washington DC and Montreal, Canada. Globally, Hornetsecurity operates in over 30 countries through its international distribution network. Its premium services are used by around 50,000 customers, including Swisscom, Telefónica, KONICA MINOLTA, LVM Versicherung and CLAAS.

Media inquiries

Please contact us at press@hornetsecurity.com.

  • Using More Complex IT Security Strategies Does Not Necessarily Increase Security, Survey Finds

        
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How to Implement a Cybersecurity First Culture https://teletrust.info/how-to-implement-a-cybersecurity-first-culture/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 04:48:57 +0000 https://teletrust.info/how-to-implement-a-cybersecurity-first-culture/ A single security mistake can hurt not only an organization’s bottom line, but also its reputation with its partners, clients and customers. Businesses today must consider security from the ground up and integrate it into all levels of the organization. Troy Markowitz, co-founder and CRO, Drata, discusses the steps to creating a culture focused on […]]]>

A single security mistake can hurt not only an organization’s bottom line, but also its reputation with its partners, clients and customers. Businesses today must consider security from the ground up and integrate it into all levels of the organization. Troy Markowitz, co-founder and CRO, Drata, discusses the steps to creating a culture focused on cybersecurity.

Organizations sometimes make the mistake of thinking that cybersecurity efforts boil down to basic steps like changing passwords and updating software. Unfortunately, there is much more than that. Security must be considered from the start to ensure data security, and leaders must identify ways to embed it at all levels of the organization. It’s easier said than done.

Data breaches in 2021 increased by 68% compared to 2020, and weak passwords aren’t the only thing driving this increase. Malicious attackers find their way to sensitive or proprietary information using all sorts of methods. The threat landscape is changing every day and the cost of each incident continues to rise. The global average cost of a data breach has risen from $3.86 million to $4.24 million in 2021.

Add to that the challenge of a hybrid or remote environment, and the whole initiative becomes more complex. This added complexity makes it more difficult to implement effective cybersecurity solutions, but it also makes it more necessary. Organizations today need even greater visibility and understanding of how employees are leveraging technology across all locations, even within their own homes. Without this, they expose themselves to significant risks.

Where can organizations start? By making cybersecurity a central part of the corporate culture.

Learn more: Why supplier cybersecurity development should be a top priority

3 essential steps to implement a culture focused on cybersecurity

Thinking about a cybersecurity strategy first isn’t easy, but it’s simple. Just follow this three-step process:

1. Implement Security Awareness Training

Basic training is a crucial part of adopting a cybersecurity mindset. It’s essential to focus on removing threats and making sure the security team knows what to look out for. To ensure they retain the information, it is essential to educate the team in a way that they can connect. This could be an opportunity to invest in resources that make safety training more fun and engaging.

From a leadership perspective, organizations should emphasize recurring training and updating training as security threats evolve. It may be a good idea to incorporate this into the onboarding process to ensure that every employee receives safety training before they even start working.

Here are some good examples of security awareness training:

  • Phishing tests
  • Interactive experiments and simulations
  • Engaging video content

Organizations can also look for certifications or attestations of compliance, such as SOC 2 (which is becoming increasingly necessary to run a modern business in the cloud). If so, they will need to demonstrate that the employees are taking security awareness training. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to security, and organizations should experiment with different methods to see which ones work best with their employees. Regular check-ins to ask for feedback on what works and what doesn’t can help continually improve the program.

2. Establish accountability

Everyone is responsible for corporate security – but at the same time, every human being and every interaction poses a potential risk. As organizations evolve, so do these risks. It’s critical to make sure employees understand that cybersecurity isn’t just the IT team’s problem, it’s a responsibility that everyone at all levels of the organization shares.

54% of successful phishing attacks the attacks included breaching customer or customer data. A person’s error is a risk. However, if employees know what to look for and how to assess and identify business risk, they can stop these attacks in their tracks. Encourage real-time information sharing through communication platforms such as Slack when receiving suspicious emails. Also, make sure everyone reads and fully understands company security policies.

The most important thing here is to think fast and move slowly. While start-ups will inherently scale quickly, security sometimes means stopping for a moment and thinking. Although it may seem counterintuitive, promoting this approach will pay off in the long run.

3. Make it part of the organization’s core values

Cybersecurity should be embedded in organizational values ​​for any company responsible for handling confidential data. It’s great to have values ​​like integrity and courage, but those things should also apply to how the company handles data and approaches cybersecurity.

This is especially true for cloud-based businesses, which face new and ever-changing threats every day. Businesses today work fast. You may work fast, but security threats move just as fast. Data is one of the most important assets that businesses have today, which means that its security must be a fundamental part of their operations.

Learn more: How companies can move from cybersecurity training to learning

The cybersecurity opportunity for organizations

While developing a culture focused on cybersecurity can seem overwhelming, this approach presents a huge opportunity for startups. By setting cybersecurity standards early and embedding security awareness into their culture, organizations can prepare for future success.

Whether a company has two employees or more than 1,000, safety must be an integral and active part of its culture. Establishing and maintaining a strong security posture requires ongoing training and adherence. Organizations can only achieve this by highlighting its importance and giving people the resources they need to educate themselves.

Remember: Any mistake can cause significant damage, not just to an organization’s bottom line, but also to its reputation and the trust it has built with its partners, clients and customers. That’s why it’s important to equip every employee with all methods of defense against today’s attacks. Cybersecurity practices are an important part of any compliance program, serving as a critical layer of evidence and helping to keep valuable data out of the reach of attackers.

How do you build a workplace culture focused on cybersecurity? Share with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Where Facebook. We would like to know!

LEARN MORE ABOUT CYBERSECURITY:

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China’s IT security hardware market with Huawei grows 14.5% annually https://teletrust.info/chinas-it-security-hardware-market-with-huawei-grows-14-5-annually/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 15:53:03 +0000 https://teletrust.info/chinas-it-security-hardware-market-with-huawei-grows-14-5-annually/ Huawei FreeBuds Pro 2 specs are now leaked online and have revealed lots of information about its upcoming features as well as capabilities for consumers. According to information from Winfuture, Huawei is working with its French audio company and a long-time partner – Devialet to beef up the Huawei FreeBuds 2 Pro specs. Huawei FreeBuds […]]]>

Huawei FreeBuds Pro 2 specs are now leaked online and have revealed lots of information about its upcoming features as well as capabilities for consumers. According to information from Winfuture, Huawei is working with its French audio company and a long-time partner – Devialet to beef up the Huawei FreeBuds 2 Pro specs.

Huawei FreeBuds Pro 2 comes with Active Noise Cancellation, which allows you to minimize background noise while listening to your favorite songs or talking on a call. To provide the best ANC effect, Huawei introduced two speakers compared to the predecessor with only one.

These new headphones are equipped with a 14-48,000 Hz range to produce massive bass for your ears and your listening experience. Then you will get Hi-Res Audio and Triple Adaptive EQ. This function simultaneously equalizes volume, position and sound to optimize playback.

Speaking of notice cancellation, Huawei has implemented three-stage active noise cancellation, which could reach up to 47 decibels, the most powerful Huawei has ever put in its smart wearables.

Don’t forget that Huawei brings the industry’s best audio and call quality in the headphones. Therefore, he built three microphones built into the system to improve audio transmission.

Specifications of huawei freebuds pro 2

Visiting the battery section, Huawei said it boasts of four hours of uninterrupted playtime with noise canceling and 6.5 hours without noise canceling. However, the charging case is there to enable maximized performance and long battery life.

The appearance of Huawei FreeBuds Pro is similar to the first generation Huawei FreeBuds Pro headphones and some finishing has been done, but a clear difference between these two will not be judged.

Huawei FreeBuds Pro 2 is available in three colors: Blue Silver, Ceramic White and Frost Silver. The price of the FreeBuds Pro headphones could start at 199 euros in Germany.

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IT Security Software Market Investment Analysis https://teletrust.info/it-security-software-market-investment-analysis/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 06:30:30 +0000 https://teletrust.info/it-security-software-market-investment-analysis/ A new research study from JCMR with the title Global IT Security Software Market Research Report 2022 provides an in-depth assessment of IT Security Software, including key market trends, upcoming technologies, industry drivers, challenges, regulatory policies and strategies. The research study provides forecasts for IT security software investments till 2030. The report includes the latest […]]]>

A new research study from JCMR with the title Global IT Security Software Market Research Report 2022 provides an in-depth assessment of IT Security Software, including key market trends, upcoming technologies, industry drivers, challenges, regulatory policies and strategies. The research study provides forecasts for IT security software investments till 2030.

The report includes the latest post-pandemic market research on the IT security software market.

Competitor analysis: ManageEngine, GlassWire, Stellar, Cloudflare, Malwarebytes, Spiceworks, Kaspersky Lab, AVG Technologies, Bitdefender, Black Duck Hub, Code42 Software

Request Free Sample PDF Report @: jcmarketresearch.com/report-details/1407214/sample

Frequently Asked Questions:

  • How fast is the market expected to grow

Year-over-year growth for 2022 is estimated at XX% and incremental growth for Computer Security Software market is estimated to be USD xxx million.

Get up to 40% off Enterprise Copy & Customization available for the following regions and countries: North America, South and Central America, Middle East and Africa, Europe, Asia-Pacific

  • Who are the key players in the IT Security Software Market?

ManageEngine, GlassWire, Stellar, Cloudflare, Malwarebytes, Spiceworks, Kaspersky Lab, AVG Technologies, Bitdefender, Black Duck Hub, Code42 Software

  • What are the key drivers and challenges for the IT Security Software market?

The demand for ASW capacity building is one of the major drivers of the IT security software market.

  • What is the size of the North America computer security software market?

North America region will contribute XX% of IT security software market share

Inquiry for IT Security Software Segment buy@ jcmarketresearch.com/report-details/1407214/enquiry
This customized IT Security Software report will also help clients track new product launches in direct and indirect market related to COVID-19, upcoming vaccines and pipeline analysis, and significant developments in the supplier operations and government regulations.

Geographical analysis of computer security software:

• North American computer security software industry: United States, Canada and Mexico.

• IT security software industry South and Central America: Argentina, Chile and Brazil.

• Middle East and Africa computer security software industry: Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Turkey, Egypt and South Africa.

• IT security software industry Europe: United Kingdom, France, Italy, Germany, Spain and Russia.

• Asia-Pacific computer security software industry: India, China, Japan, South Korea, Indonesia, Singapore and Australia.

Market Analysis by Types & The market analysis by applications is as follows:

Market segment by Type, the product can be split into – Cloud-Based – On-Premise market segment by Application, split into – Large Enterprise – SME

Some of the Points Covered in the Global Computer Security Software Market Research Report are:

Chapter 1: Global IT Security Software Market Overview (2015-2030)
• Definition of computer security software
• Computer security software specifications
• Classification of computer security software
• Computer security software applications
• Computer Security Software Regions

Chapter 2: Computer Security Software Market competition by players/vendors 2015 and 2022
• IT security software manufacturing cost structure
• Raw hardware and computer security software providers
• Computer security software manufacturing process
• Industry chain structure of computer security software

Chapter 3: Computer Security Software Sales (Volume) and Revenue (Value) by Region (2015-2022)
• Sales of computer security software
• IT Security Software Revenue and Market Share

Chapter 4, 5 and 6: Global IT Security Software Market by Type, Application and Player/Supplier Profiles (2015-2022)
• IT Security Software Market Share by Type and Application
• Growth rate of IT Security Software by type and application
• Computer security software drivers and opportunities
• Basic information about computer security software company

Continue……………

Note: Please share your budget by call/mail. We will try to meet your needs. @ Call: +1 (925) 478-7203 / E-mail: sales@jcmarketresearch.com
Find more computer security software industry research reports. By JC Market Research.

Thank you for reading this article; you can also get individual chapter wise section or region wise report version like North America, Europe or Asia.

About the Author:

JCMR’s global research and market intelligence consulting organization is uniquely positioned to not only identify growth opportunities, but also to empower and inspire you to create visionary growth strategies for the future, through our extraordinary depth and breadth of thought leadership, research, tools, events and experience. that help you make goals a reality. Our understanding of the interplay between industry convergence, megatrends, technologies and market trends provides our clients with new business models and opportunities for expansion. We are focused on identifying the “Accurate Forecast” in each industry we cover so that our clients can reap the benefits of being early market entrants and can achieve their “Goals and Objectives”.

Contact us: https://jcmarketresearch.com/contact-us

JCMARKETRESEARCH

Mark Baxter (Business Development Manager)

Call: +1 (925) 478-7203

E-mail: sales@jcmarketresearch.com

Join us on – LinkedIn

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Information Technology (IT) Security Market as a Service to Witness Huge Growth by 2030 | Blue Coat, Cisco, IBM, Intel Security – Designer Women https://teletrust.info/information-technology-it-security-market-as-a-service-to-witness-huge-growth-by-2030-blue-coat-cisco-ibm-intel-security-designer-women/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 16:28:55 +0000 https://teletrust.info/information-technology-it-security-market-as-a-service-to-witness-huge-growth-by-2030-blue-coat-cisco-ibm-intel-security-designer-women/ Los Angeles, USA, North America including Q1-2022 analysis The report named, Global Information Technology (IT) Security as a Service Market has been added to the market research archives by JCMR. Industry experts and researchers have come up with a reliable and accurate analysis of the Information Technology (IT) Security as a Service considering many aspects […]]]>

Los Angeles, USA, North America including Q1-2022 analysis The report named, Global Information Technology (IT) Security as a Service Market has been added to the market research archives by JCMR. Industry experts and researchers have come up with a reliable and accurate analysis of the Information Technology (IT) Security as a Service considering many aspects such as growth factors, challenges, limitations, developments, trends and growth opportunities. This report on Information Technology (IT) Security as a Service will surely serve as a handy instrument for market players to develop effective strategies with the aim of strengthening their market positions. This Information Technology (IT) Security as a Service report offers a pinpoint analysis of changing dynamics and emerging trends in the global Information Technology (IT) Security as a Service market. .

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Additionally, the Information Technology (IT) Security as a Service report offers a futuristic outlook on various factors that are likely to drive the growth of the global Information Technology (IT) Security as a Service market. than service in the years to come. Additionally, the authors of the report have shed light on the factors that may hinder the growth of the global Information Technology (IT) Security-as-a-Service market.

The report also helps to understand the global Information Technology (IT) Security-as-a-Service market through key segments including application, product type, and end-user. This analysis is based on various parameters such as CGAR, share, size, production and consumption.

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The Information Technology (IT) Security as a Service report also focused on the competitive landscape and the key strategies deployed by market players to strengthen their presence in the global technology security market information (IT) as a service. It helps competitors to make informed business decisions by having a holistic view of the market scenario. Key players operating in Information Technology (IT) Security as a Service comprising Blue Coat, Cisco, IBM, Intel Security, Symantec, Alert Logic are also presented in the report.

What does the Information Technology (IT) Security Report as a Service have to offer?

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What trends and challenges will influence the growth of the market?
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Find more research reports on Information Technology (IT) Security as a Service Industry. By JC Market Research.

About the Author:

JCMR’s global research and market intelligence consulting organization is uniquely positioned to not only identify growth opportunities, but also to empower and inspire you to create visionary growth strategies for the future, through our extraordinary depth and breadth of thought leadership, research, tools, events and experience. that help you turn your goals into reality. Our understanding of the interplay between industry convergence, megatrends, technologies and market trends provides our clients with new business models and opportunities for expansion. We are focused on identifying the “Accurate Forecast” in each industry we cover so that our clients can reap the benefits of being early market entrants and can achieve their “Goals and Objectives”.

Contact us: https://jcmarketresearch.com/contact-us

JC MARKET RESEARCH

Mark Baxter (Business Development Manager)

Phone: +1 (925) 478-7203

Email: sales@jcmarketresearch.com

Join us on – LinkedIn

www.jcmarketresearch.com

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What is an SQL injection (SQLi) and how to prevent it? https://teletrust.info/what-is-an-sql-injection-sqli-and-how-to-prevent-it/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 15:24:32 +0000 https://teletrust.info/what-is-an-sql-injection-sqli-and-how-to-prevent-it/ Cybersecurity has become one of the main concerns of this digital age. Every day we encounter news of Ransomware, Phishingfraud and other cyber crimes. It is true that we cannot change the mindset of cybercriminals, but we can take preventive measures to avoid different types of cyber attacks. So here we are going to discuss […]]]>

Cybersecurity has become one of the main concerns of this digital age. Every day we encounter news of Ransomware, Phishingfraud and other cyber crimes.

It is true that we cannot change the mindset of cybercriminals, but we can take preventive measures to avoid different types of cyber attacks. So here we are going to discuss the SQL Injection-A common type of malware.

Read to the end to find out what is anSQL injection, its objectives, its impacts, its types and a concrete example. This blog also includes advice on how to prevent sql injections, which is extremely useful for technology-focused businesses.

What is SQL Injection (SQLi)?

So, first of all: What is SQL Injection?

SQL stands for Structured Query Language, a language designed to manipulate and manage data in a database. A SQLI hacker injects malicious codes into existing SQL items to trick systems into giving them access. Attackers deploy this technique to intercept data or locate administrator credentials, which helps them gain complete control of a system or network.

How do SQL injection attacks work?

SQL injection attacks are made through web pages or application inputs. These input forms are usually visible in search boxes, form pages or URL parameters.

To attempt a SQLI attackthreat actors find vulnerabilities in a system or network and inject malicious payloads that perform unintended actions, such as granting access to data.

There is another trick where they just have to provide their target page URL to an automated tool, and the job is done.

Example of SQL injection (SQLi)

In 2017, a Russian-speaking menacing actor, Rasputin, managed to gain access to the systems of over 60 US universities and government agencies using SQL injection vulnerabilities.

It was later discovered that he used to design his own tools to perform such attacks instead of using free tools. The stolen information was offered for sale on cybercrime black markets.

What are the objectives and the impact of an SQL injection?

The purpose of attempting a injection attack with SQL is to gain unauthorized access to systems, critical information and data such as passwords, credit card information and personally identifiable information. This can consequently tarnish the image of a reputable organization and even lead to long-term exploitation of data. In addition to this, hackers can:

  • Delete or modify database content
  • Export source code files
  • Write files to the database server

It is therefore essential to train you and your employees on how to prevent sql injection attacks to protect your company’s data, customers and reputation.

What are the types of SQL injection attacks?

There are five common ways for hackers to inject malicious code and gain control of a system or network. Let’s discuss it briefly.

Union-Based SQL Injection

Syndicate based SQL Injection allows attackers to obtain data by extending the results of an original query. It basically combines the result set of two or more SELECT statement queries.

Blind SQL Injection

Blindly SQL Injection technique, cyber criminals interrogate the database with true or false questions and determine the answers based on the answers. It is coupled with a time-based SQL injection attack as it also takes time into account when evaluating received responses.

Boolean-based SQL injection

Here, hackers trick databases into thinking they have elevated permissions or correct credentials. This method overrides the conditions and logic of a query. It is sometimes associated with a blind SQL Injection, where the elimination technique extracts the required data.

Error-Based SQL Injection

When malicious actors exploit database errors from a webpage or an application through uncleaned entries, it is called the error-based problem. SQL Injection technical. It uses error messages to return query results, often revealing confidential data.

Time-Based SQL Injection

This technique is used when malicious actors fail to retrieve information from a database server. Thus, they use operations that take longer to process. It is typically used when hackers need to know if there are vulnerabilities in target systems.

How to detect an SQL injection?

SQL injections are difficult to detect, as they leave no traces like other malware. The only effective way to detect SQLI attacks is to use a vulnerability scanner to actively monitor your databases. It will also tell you the level of risk and the overall impact of such an attack on your website.

How to prevent SQL injection hacking?

It’s not easy to detect SQLI attacks, but you can still practice some preventative measures to avoid them. First, avoid displaying database errors directly to users. Here are other ways to prevent SQL injection attacks.

Form and maintain awareness

Organize regular training sessions for new and old employees, especially those in the technical department. They should be aware of SQL Injection risks and mitigation methods. You can start by creating small manuals or brochures and include them in the new employee welcome kit.

Don’t trust user input

Treat all user input as untrusted because they all pose a risk of attack. Also maintain a practice of treating internal users the same way you treat public comments. You can also perform allowlist validation to test any user input against a set of approved and defined inputs. Data that does not match the assigned values ​​is rejected, which mitigates SQL injections.

Use the whitelist method

Deploy whitelist method instead of blocklist. In the whitelist, only email addresses, IP addresses, domain names, and apps from a list are allowed, while all others are denied. This will help to prevent after injection attacks by denying unauthorized entities like external hackers.

Welcome to new technologies

Old malware protection techniques cannot protect your systems against injection attacks with SQL. The latest tools and software can handle the Structured Query Language and the vectors that attack it.

Use only verified mechanisms

Avoid downloading free tools and software claiming protection against all kinds of cyber attacks, including SQLI attacks, because they can be a trap set by pirates. Instead, use modern paid tools like a web application firewall that genuinely detects, prevent and remove malware.

How to delete an SQL injection?

If an SQL injection attack hits your website, you can take the following steps to fix the problem.

Locate the vulnerable code

Start by identifying where the vulnerability is using a trusted automated tool such as jSQL, Havij, or SQLmap.

Remove injected content and backdoors

After knowing the location of the vulnerable code, get rid of malicious injections and corrupted data. It is useful to have a clean backup of your database to restore it to an uncompromised state.

Fix the vulnerability

It is important to call in an expert and fix vulnerabilities regularly. Otherwise, hackers can exploit them again to try SQL injection attacks.

Update your data

Clean and update all your data to prevent another attack. You should also change passwords for all important accounts and folders right after an expert fixes all vulnerabilities. Make sure there are no malicious admins or backdoors in your database.

Set up a WAF

Use a web application firewall or WAF to filter out malicious requests. These help prevent zero-day attacks when a patch is not yet available to fix a vulnerability.

Final Thoughts

Hackers inject malicious code into existing SQL elements to break into a system, intercept data, or locate administrator credentials. Use a vulnerability scanner to frequently monitor database activity. Remember that SQL injections show no physical traces until an attack. Also, it is best to use the whitelist technique and patch vulnerabilities regularly. Keep your data up to date, secure, clean and make consistent backups. Overall, implement the tips in this article to effectively prevent SQL injection attacks.

The post What is SQL injection (SQLi) and how to prevent it? appeared first on EasyDMARC.

*** This is an EasyDMARC Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog written by EasyDmarc. Read the original post at: https://easydmarc.com/blog/what-is-an-sql-injection-sqli-and-how-to-prevent-it/

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3 Tips to Mitigate the Insider Threat Facing Government Organizations https://teletrust.info/3-tips-to-mitigate-the-insider-threat-facing-government-organizations/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://teletrust.info/3-tips-to-mitigate-the-insider-threat-facing-government-organizations/ Verizon’s 2022 Data Breach Investigation Report (DBIR) was recently released and it contains both good and bad news regarding the risk of insider attacks. First the good news, sort of. According to the DBIR, the vast majority of breaches continue to come from outside actors (80% vs. 18% from insiders). I hope we can be […]]]>

Verizon’s 2022 Data Breach Investigation Report (DBIR) was recently released and it contains both good and bad news regarding the risk of insider attacks.

First the good news, sort of. According to the DBIR, the vast majority of breaches continue to come from outside actors (80% vs. 18% from insiders). I hope we can be a little less suspicious of Bob who is sitting two desks away from you.

However, when an inside attack does occur, it can be really, really destructive.

The DBIR found that the median number of records compromised as a result of an insider breach last year was 80,000. That’s not great, but it’s getting worse. When we look at the totals, the number of records breached by insider attacks exceeded 1,000,000,000, compared to well under 250,000,000 from outside actors.

Thus, even though the percentage of breaches caused by insiders remains low, they continue to be a constant and serious concern for the private and public sectors.

Insider Threat Risks Facing the Government Sector

Basically, the concern is that someone in the organization is stealing data and harming the organization, whether you are in the private sector or the government.

The big difference is in the sensitivity and potential magnitude of damage that can result from such an incident.

An internal incident can:

  1. Damage national security

By stealing or leaking sensitive information, an insider can cause damage – in the most extreme examples – defense or intelligence secrets can fall into the hands of rival nations.

The most (in)famous government insider is Edward Snowden. Without providing too many details, the intelligence community said Snowden had caused significant damage to US national security.

As great power competition continues to escalate between the United States and China, we see a steady stream of current and former government employees being discovered and convicted of espionage.

  1. Steal tons of personal information

The government holds a lot of personally identifiable information (PII) that can be used by malicious actors for profit or to carry out additional attacks.

The Office of Personnel Management breach is a vivid example of when Chinese hackers stole 22.1 million documents, including the personal information of many government employees in sensitive intelligence positions.

While this may be an external attack, given the number of records an insider would have, the potential for personal information exposure is incredibly high.

  1. undermine public trust

The public trusts the government with its data and expects it to take precautions to protect it.

Failure to do so erodes confidence that the government is up to the task and can make more people reluctant to provide more data. As biometrics advance, particularly for access and service identification, many may wonder whether organizations that cannot secure social security numbers or addresses can trust the data points of faces.

These events, and the concerns behind them, have led over the years to an intensification of government efforts to deal with insider threats.

This includes publishing helpful guides from the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency and the National Insider Threat Task Force. These organizations understand that the national security risk is not just for government organizations, but also for government contractors.

Contractors, especially those working in defense like aviation, face increased regulatory regimes such as the National Industrial Security Operating Manual (NISPOM) Change 2 to show they are taking action to defend against internal threats.

Why are insiders so harmful?

Insiders have access to your sensitive information by default in order to do their job.

We do our best to ensure that we hire trustworthy people, but there is always a risk.

For better or for worse, they know where the juicy data is. This makes them both a potentially effective employee and a security risk.

An insider may be well placed to compromise the security of your organization from each of the members of the CIA Triad which explains how we conceptualize security.

  • Privacy – data leaks
  • Integrity – we no longer trust the data
  • Access – we cannot access the data (think ransomware)

Insider threats are embarrassing and can be corrosive to an organization’s morale. Not only is it terrible to lose trust in other members of your team, but many organizations can overcompensate for a breach by taking security measures that bring work to a screeching halt.

An insider can help outside hackers carry out a ransomware attack. This happens in the private sector more often than you might think, as it helps malicious actors save time and effort by simply spending a little money.

Why bother going through a phishing campaign to social engineer their target when they can just slip someone a few thousand dollars to leave the side door open?

Why are insiders hard to detect?

An insider can be like an Advanced Persistent Threat (APT), i.e. foreign government hackers, in that they can be inside your network for ages before being discovered.

This is often because they want to avoid the big splash of a ransomware attack which attracts a lot of attention and brings the attack to a head. They want to stay put for as long as possible, siphoning off data and squeezing their way to their target’s most valuable assets.

The challenge for defenders is that this low shudder approach is very difficult to detect and can allow them to cause significant damage.

Hopefully we do our best to segment access to sensitive information so that a single insider can’t cause too much damage on their own. Insiders can also be difficult to fight because they don’t use malware or exploits to reach their target data. As often privileged members of the organization, they have legitimate credentials to access massive amounts of data without anyone raising an eyebrow about it.

That said, as with Snowden, in a segmented organization, no employee should have enough privileges that they can access too often. Snowden had to “borrow” access from his colleagues, unwittingly dragging them into his deception.

3 Tips to Mitigate Insider Threat Risk

Similar to defending against external threat actors, we are not able to fully prevent internal attacks from occurring in some cases.

What we can do, however, is put measures in place to reduce the risk of them happening by strengthening our posture and mitigating the damage that can occur should an incident occur.

Here are some helpful tips.

Monitor user behavior for anomalies

Providing access to sensitive data is a necessity for your team to do their job, and in most cases that’s not a problem because most employees aren’t going to steal information.

But we still want to make sure that no worker can have too much access beyond their needs. Ideally, you restrict access on a need-to-know basis, on a least-privilege model.

The trick is to make sure your employees stick to their lanes and don’t access files or other resources that aren’t within their purview.

Use user behavior analysis tools to monitor if a user begins to take actions outside of their normal routine range. There may be legitimate reasons for unusual behavior, but it is always important to detect and investigate them.

Additionally, abnormal user behavior may indicate that their account has been compromised by an external threat actor without their knowledge, giving even more reason to monitor this space.

Keep your employees close and your future departures even closer

Former employees should also be factored into our thinking about insider threats.

Make sure workers about to leave take nothing with them but good memories. Monitor downloads or data transfers before they leave.

A key threat to watch out for is sitting on their keychains. USB drives can be a convenient way for an employee to download and walk away with your data. Advances in hardware have brought these nifty little hard drives to the point where they’re both cheaper and more capable of massive storage than in the past.

If possible, prevent the use of these devices by blocking the ports on your machines. Another option is to make sure your monitoring tools detect whenever a flash drive is plugged in and log it for future forensic analysis.

Implement rapid investigations and incident response

if you see something, say something.

Because of how quickly these incidents can happen, if you suspect something is wrong, call your investigation team as soon as possible.

With any luck, you can prevent a massive leak from happening, catching the thief before they can get too far. But speed here is key.

Also, be sure to engage people who are not directly connected to your system to conduct the survey and response.

Avoid overreaction

Remember to balance security with usability/operational efficiency

Strong security is not the same as locking down your department’s IT like Fort Knox. The goal of a good security strategy is to allow your organization to do its job while minimizing risk.

Slowing down work by putting too much friction in place will only create frustration among your staff. Implementing measures that are too intrusive, this level depending on factors such as sensitivity levels, can even lead to resentment that can cause your employees to take another look at the private sector.

Also remember that you need to maintain a level of trust with your employees. Without it, their ability to work as a cohesive unit will impact their ability to achieve collective goals.

Hopefully, with the right combination of security monitoring and best practices, your team will be able to trust and verify, paving the way for a safe and productive work environment.


Prevent insider threats and secure your agency

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What Financial Companies Can Learn About IT Security From Gaming Companies https://teletrust.info/what-financial-companies-can-learn-about-it-security-from-gaming-companies/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 03:06:39 +0000 https://teletrust.info/what-financial-companies-can-learn-about-it-security-from-gaming-companies/ Players test out systems in the gaming area during day three of New York Comic Con 2021 at the Jacob Javits Center on October 9, 2021 in New York City. (Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for ReedPop) Despite being under constant fire from attackers, financial institutions as a whole arguably do better than companies […]]]>
Players test out systems in the gaming area during day three of New York Comic Con 2021 at the Jacob Javits Center on October 9, 2021 in New York City. (Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for ReedPop)

Despite being under constant fire from attackers, financial institutions as a whole arguably do better than companies in other industries when it comes to IT security. However, that doesn’t mean they can’t learn a thing or two from other industries.

The online gaming industry is also targeted by many cyber criminals due to their possession of personal information and user payments. For this reason, financial companies, gaming companies and customers are often the target of account takeover attacks or, increasingly, synthetic account attacks. (Synthetic account attacks occur when cyber thieves use information from a multitude of different accounts to create a realistic-looking fraudulent account.)

“The master fraudsters who typically attack gaming companies are now also targeting financial institutions,” said Kevin Gosschalk, founder and CEO of Arkose Labs. So-called “master cheats” are more persistent attackers who “script multiple tools, use cheat farms, and are willing to invest more time and money to bypass defenses,” Gosschalk said.

Gosschalk said the types of attacks vary, but most banks primarily deal with account takeover attacks, application fraud, and a small percentage (around 9%) of synthetic account attacks. In the metaverse, however, financial companies and gaming companies are seeing a growing percentage — 30% growth in recent months — of synthetic or fake account attacks, according to Gosschalk.

With synthetic account volume growing at such a rapid rate for online businesses, Gosschalk said, “Banks will need to adapt fraud prevention strategies quickly to deter volumetric attacks.

“Synthetic accounts are extremely difficult to detect and deter because they appear to be genuine consumers,” Gosschalk continued. “Banks need to develop the ability to defend against this type of attack now, so they are prepared to protect their consumers’ online accounts later.”

Jeff Wheat, Chief Technology Officer of Lumu, pointed out that in the gaming industry “the threat at the business level is the risk of taking too many bets on one side or the other of a bet.

“They’re constantly assessing that risk and responding by updating the ‘odds’ on the bet,” Wheat said. “This constant evaluation is the key to their financial security.”

Similarly, financial institutions “need to constantly assess the level of compromise within their organization,” Wheat said. “From a network security perspective, the gaming industry does a good job of segmenting its internal networks – to move the crown jewels to the center of the castle and protect financial assets with layered defenses.”

“To do this, financial institutions also need to understand what they are protecting or ‘labeling’,” Wheat added, “and monitoring critical elements continuously and with higher priority.”

As fraudsters hone their techniques, financial institutions are dealing with growing volumes of traffic, which is hard to categorize as “good” or “bad,” according to Gosschalk.

Rather than piling on additional layers of threat scores or slowing users down with out-of-band authentication, financial institutions need robust secondary filtering delivered directly into the normal user workflow, Gosschalk added.

Just like gaming companies, “Banks investing in the metaverse should place a high premium on trust and security when logging into the account, registering and taking actions on the platform to protect identities. avatars in their virtual worlds,” he said.

That means U.S. financial institutions “are going to have to flex new cybersecurity muscles to operate in the metaverse,” Gosschalk said. “With this understanding, as banks build and deploy their metaverse strategies, they can create controls specific to the types of attacks they will most likely encounter in the metaverse.”

How Banks Can Practice Cybersecurity in the Metaverse, According to Kevin Gosschalk, Founder and CEO of Arkose Labs

As banks begin to explore the metaverse, they need to rethink their cybersecurity posture to protect customers in the virtual world. To stay ahead of fraudsters, banks should look to gaming companies like EA, Blizzard, and Roblox who are pioneering this new digital territory, to understand cybersecurity best practices.

  1. Sophisticated cybercriminals: Metaverse attackers script multiple tools, use cheat farms, and are willing to invest more capital to bypass defenses. Banks that invest in the metaverse must place a high premium on trust and security when logging into the account, registering, and performing actions on the platform to protect the identities of avatars in their virtual worlds.
  2. Younger targets: Banks should be aware that metaverse users are likely to be much younger than traditional bank customers. As the metaverse is embraced by an increasingly younger generation, the authentication methods expected will be very different from what we are today with passwords, OTPs, etc.
  3. New Attack Techniques: Most banks are unprepared for the upsurge in synthetic account attacks in the metaverse (up 30% vs. 9% in the real world). Synthetic identities are extremely difficult to detect and deter because they appear as real consumers in the virtual world. Additionally, the volume of synthetic accounts that exist is huge for metaverse businesses – so banks will need to quickly adapt fraud prevention strategies to deter volumetric attacks.
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Software supply chain security is not a game. Or is it? https://teletrust.info/software-supply-chain-security-is-not-a-game-or-is-it/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 17:53:19 +0000 https://teletrust.info/software-supply-chain-security-is-not-a-game-or-is-it/ Jasmine Noel from ReversingLabs changed it up a bit at the RSA conference with her”Software supply chain security is not a game, is it? » presentation and made it an interactive experience for viewers. His game show for attendees made it fun, but also covered key insights into the state of ReversingLabs’ software supply chain […]]]>

Jasmine Noel from ReversingLabs changed it up a bit at the RSA conference with her”Software supply chain security is not a game, is it? » presentation and made it an interactive experience for viewers. His game show for attendees made it fun, but also covered key insights into the state of ReversingLabs’ software supply chain security. recent survey of 300 global IT and security professionals.

DevOps/Cloud-Native Live!  Boston

Here are some of the questions posed to the public from this survey.

Question 1: What is the software supply chain risk that software vendors are most concerned about today?

The answer: software vulnerabilities. Noel pointed out that the results of this survey make sense when considering the impact of Log4j, which has made the industry more aware of the risks associated with software vulnerabilities. Moving on, she asked participants what percentage of organizations can actually detect software tampering, another major supply chain risk.

An audience member who guessed the answer correctly: only a few (37%) of software vendors can actually detect tampering. Pushing the tampering further, Noel asked for a follow-up: how many of these organizations that check for tampering, check after the construction process is finished? Participants, unable to answer the question correctly, were amazed to learn that about half of these organizations don’t check after construction.

Question 2: What are the main reasons organizations use SBOMs?

Moving on from direct supply chain risks, Jasmine discussed the importance of using software bills of materials (SBOM) in the fight to secure software. She again drew on our survey findings to ask participants about their knowledge of the state of SBOMs. First, she asked the audience what were the top reasons organizations use SBOMs.

Participants guessed correctly: Wanting to find out if risks are present in a software product, as well as wanting to follow best practices.

Issue 3: Why are many organizations still not generating and reviewing SBOMs?

Next, Noel asked participants why many organizations still do not generate and review SBOMs, despite all the attention given to them by the federal government and beyond.

The answer: A general lack of internal expertise and personnel to do the job properly. To finish,

Question 4: Which SBOM components are the most reviewed?

Jasmine tested the participants on the most reviewed components of an SBOM. A number of audience members answered correctly, saying that in-house developed components as well as open source components are the key factors for most organizations when considering an SBOM.

The Real Price: Understanding the Risk of Software Supply Chain Attacks

People who answered Noel’s questions were rewarded with prizes, providing a true game show experience. But there is no doubt that software supply chain security is a game or not.

Based on the results of these polls…that is definitely not the case. It is clear that the industry as a whole lacks the ability to secure software and needs modern solutions to address this ever growing problem. To learn more about the state of software security, check out ReversingLab’s new report on the recent investigation.

ReversingLabs offers innovative solutions that meet the needs of the software industry. If you want to learn more about how we help organizations software assurance strategies, check out secure.software, our modern solution to address software supply chain risk. We are now offering early access to the full launch of this solution, so be sure to talk to us to get all the benefits this solution could bring to your organization.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from the ReversingLabs blog written by Carolynn van Arsdale. Read the original post at: https://blog.reversinglabs.com/blog/software-supply-chain-security-is-no-game.-or-is-it

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MHRA IT Security Strategy Freedom of Information Request (FOI 21/1270) https://teletrust.info/mhra-it-security-strategy-freedom-of-information-request-foi-21-1270/ Tue, 31 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://teletrust.info/mhra-it-security-strategy-freedom-of-information-request-foi-21-1270/ FAITH 21/1270 December 9, 2021 Expensive Thank you for your email. We can only partially answer questions 1 and 2, the rest of the information is exempt under section 31 of the FOI Act for the following reasons: The Agency, like any organization, is subject to cyberattacks and since it holds large amounts of sensitive, […]]]>

FAITH 21/1270

December 9, 2021

Expensive

Thank you for your email.

We can only partially answer questions 1 and 2, the rest of the information is exempt under section 31 of the FOI Act for the following reasons:

The Agency, like any organization, is subject to cyberattacks and since it holds large amounts of sensitive, personal and confidential information, maintaining the security of this information is extremely important. Cyberattacks, which can be criminal offences, for example under the Computer Misuse Act 1990 or the Data Protection Act 1998, are classified as a Level 1 threat by the UK government.

In this context, providing the requested information would provide information about the Agency’s information security systems and its resistance to cyber attacks. There is a very strong public interest in ensuring that the Agency’s information systems are not subject to cyberattacks. Providing the type of information requested would likely provide attackers with information about the state of our cybersecurity defenses, which is not in the public interest.

1. Do you have a formal IT security policy? (Please provide a link to the strategy)

Yes

2. Does this policy specifically address monitoring the configurations of network-connected devices to identify any malicious or non-malicious changes to device configuration?

Yes

I hope you find this information useful.

If you have a question about this, please reply to this email.

If you are not satisfied with the handling of your request, you have the right to request an internal review. Requests for internal review should be submitted within two months of the date you receive this response and addressed to: info@mhra.gov.uk. Due to the current Covid-19 situation, we are unable to accept delivery of documents or correspondence by post or courier to any of our offices. Remember to quote the above reference number in all future communication.

Should you remain unsatisfied with the outcome of the internal review, you would have the right to request a decision directly from the Information Commissioner. Please keep in mind that the Information Commissioner will not normally review our handling of your request unless you have first contacted us to conduct an internal review. The Information Commissioner can be contacted at:

Information Commissioner’s Office

Wycliffe House

Waterway

Wilmslow

cheshire

SK9 5AF

Cordially,

MHRA Customer Service Center

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